About

We tend to eat out now and then – okay, we eat out a lot! For years, people have been telling us, “You should write about the places you eat and post them so that we know where to eat.”

I’m not sure why our friends think we’re qualified to write about food, however, after talking about this for years, we decided to dive into the blogosphere. Is that what you call it? At any rate, we will be blogging about our food and drink experiences in the Nashville, Tenn. area. Occasionally, we may write about our experiences in other cities, as well.

In the interest of full disclosure, we love high-flavored foods.  So don’t expect to see reviews of every meat-and-three in town.  We typically don’t eat at places that serve cooked-to-death vegetables or anything that is country-fried.  We’re not snobs, mind you. We just like high-flavored foods, ergo the name of the blog.

Feel free to share your opinions of the places we post.  But keep in mind opinions are like noses. Everybody has one…and some are bigger than others. Keep it civil and, whenever possible, understandable.

Thanks for taking the time to visit.

John and Michelle

30 Comments Add yours

  1. Sandra Sink Sykes says:

    For Tammy Algood… I read your articles in the Independent Mail of Anderson, SC. My ? is about freezer jam. Can Splenda be used instead of sugar? I ♥️ your articles! Thanks!

    Like

    1. Tammy Algood says:

      Sandra, You can use Splenda along with no-sugar needed pectin. You will find that the package inserts give specific directions on when to add the sugar substitute, which is typically after cooking and just before transferring to jars. There are several no sugar needed pectins that are good: Ball, Sure-Jell, and Mrs. Wages. Do not attempt to substitute Splenda for regular sugar when using regular pectin, whether it is liquid or powdered.

      Like

    2. Tom Ryan says:

      I recently read your guest column about cherry tomatoes. I put mine in a large pot, but only get them for 2 months, sounds like you prefer to plant yours in the ground?

      Like

  2. jm kuno says:

    you do not provide an email address for tammy algood. please do so.

    Like

    1. John Sloan says:

      JM, I will pass along your message.

      Like

  3. Donald M Maze says:

    I read the piece about mustard by Tammy? in the Des Moines Register today. I love mustard of several types so it caught my eye. She probably knows that there is a mustard museum in Middleton, Wisconsin with hundreds of varieties. I’ll be accessing your website more from now on.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Tammy Algood says:

      I did NOT know there was mustard museum in Wisconsin! That gives me a wonderful addition for fun the next time I am in the area. Thanks so much for letting me know about it! Mustard is Magic!

      Like

  4. RON FISCHER says:

    Is there a way to contact Tammy Algood on here? I used to talk to her some when she was at the Tennessean probably 8-10 years ago. Anyway, I am trying to find the best way to keep squash, yellow and zucchini without canning it. Any ideas?

    Like

    1. Tammy Algood says:

      I did NOT know there was mustard museum in Wisconsin! That gives me a wonderful addition for fun the next time I am in the area. Thanks so much for letting me know about it! Mustard is Magic!

      Like

      1. Tammy Algood says:

        Hello Ron! You can certainly freeze squash, but the problem is that is tends to become watery when thawed. So allow it to drain in a colander before use so you aren’t adding extra moisture to your recipe. If you utilize zucchini in making quick bread, you can freeze the loaves for up to 6 months.

        Like

  5. arlene Lapp says:

    I love Jerusalem artichokes, but cannot find them anywhere in Nashville. Where can I find them? You wrote an article about using them. I have gotten them when I visit my daughter in Chicago,
    Thank you
    Arlene Lapp

    Like

    1. Tammy Algood says:

      Arlene, The first ones I found were at Trader Joe’s and they were exceptional. That only ignited my craving and I returned only to find a few in stock, so I purchased all they had. Then I found an abundance at Whole Foods and have been purchasing them from there. My neighbor actually found some at Publix, but I haven’t been so lucky at the one I frequent. I hope this helps!

      Like

  6. David Nyhuise says:

    how to use parsnips other than soups ???

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    1. John Sloan says:

      David, that’s a great question! We will investigate and see what we can find.

      Like

      1. Tammy Algood says:

        David, I love to roast them … it is simply delicious! Just peel and slice, then toss with a little olive oil, salt and pepper. Roast in a preheated 350 oven for around 25 minutes. My husband likes them roasted a bit longer. Make sure they are in a single layer on the baking dish. It is magnificent!

        Like

  7. Just discovered this – can you search for previous recipes?

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    1. John Sloan says:

      Susan, if you will scroll to the bottom of the page, you will see older posts, as well as a Search box. Thanks for reading!

      Like

  8. Barbara Z Sander says:

    a much easier way to reduce fat when cooking ground beef, turkey etc than dousing with boiling water…ick! Fit a small colander over a glass bowl, break up ground beef in it, cover with piece of paper towel, microwave one pound a total of 5 minutes….but in increments, breaking up beef….all the fat drips into the glass bowl…do not need to completely cook, as it will continue to brown

    Like

  9. Larry R Price says:

    The Indianapolis Star published your Breakfast Biscuit receipe but did not specify the liquid , oven heat, and the baking time. Tried to look up
    on your web site but couldn’t find it.

    Like

    1. John Sloan says:

      Larry, we don’t have a post for a Breakfast Biscuit recipe, but you should check out our post for Cheddar Drop Biscuits. They are amazing!

      Like

      1. Tammy Algood says:

        Larry, How crazy not to print the entire recipe! Here is my weekend go to recipe:
        Buttermilk Biscuits
        These biscuits deliciously hold sausage patties as well as homemade jam and butter.
        Yield: 12 to 14 biscuits
        2 cups all-purpose flour
        21/2 teaspoons baking powder
        1/2 teaspoon baking soda
        1 teaspoon salt
        2 tablespoons vegetable shortening or lard
        1 cup buttermilk
        Preheat the oven to 450°F. Lightly grease a cast iron biscuit baker or baking pan and set aside.
        Place the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a mixing bowl. Cut in the shortening with a pastry blender or 2 forks until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the buttermilk and stir until a soft dough is formed, about 25 strokes.
        Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth, about 10 times. Roll to 1/2-inch thickness. Cut with a 2-inch cutter and transfer to the prepared pan. Bake 13 to 15 minutes or until golden brown. Serve hot.

        Like

  10. Fred Berry says:

    Just read Tammy Algood’s short commentary about the versatility of coconut in the Daily Oklahoman. I have peanut butter, toasted coconut and honey between two pieces of toast with a glass of milk for breakfast each morning. Give it a try, it’s great.

    Like

  11. Patricia McGee says:

    I read about how you make gelato in our local newspaper using an electric Donvier ice cream maker, but unfortunately, there was not recipe for the gelato. We have loved gelato since our trips to Italy and can find no where in the U.S. that tastes the same. I would love to know show you make it. Thank you.

    Like

  12. Peggy Marsheck says:

    Hi Tammy, I read your article about mint in the Tennessean this morning. Try adding a handful of leaves into a pot of English peas. You will never eat them another way.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Cody Roberts says:

    For Tammy Algood:

    I’m looking for a tomato with a HIGH acidity flavor!! Any help? Also looking for silver queen corn! Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. John Sloan says:

      Cody, Silver Queen Corn should be easy to locate at any farmers market. Where do you live? I bought some at the Murfreesboro market last week. As fas as a high acid tomato, Celebrity & Rutgers will be the easiest to find. If you happen upon Purple Calabash it is another good one! Good luck!

      Like

  14. JUANITA SWANN-GILBERT says:

    I enjoy your articles in the Asheville NC paper. Wondering where (or if) you get economical almonds? This was your recent article in our paper this week.

    Like

  15. momtocam says:

    Discovered your website via the Gaston Gazette today. Always looking for new food-recipe blogs. Will share too -:) Belmont NC

    Like

  16. Michelle Russo says:

    I read your article on Chilled Limoncello easy to make, better to drink. Your recipe is much easier then the recipe we were using. In the article you mention limoncello cookies, but no recipe is listed. I would love to try the limoncello cookies, if you’re willing to share the recipe.

    Like

  17. Amelia Vidmar says:

    I read Tammy Algood’s column today in the Erie Times News and need to point out that while some mistakenly call potato flour
    “Potato starch “ they are not at all the same thing. Potato starch is the highly refined starch from potatoes. Potato flour is the whole dried potato, ground to a coarse flour. You cannot substitute one for the other in ANY recipe. When you moisten potato flour you essentially get mashed unseasoned potato . Potato starch is a very useful product in gluten free baking.

    Like

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